Tips for Cleaning Rexine Made Products

Rexine can very easily be defined as a registered trademark of any artificial leather that is produced by the United Kingdom. It is basically made of a cloth that is surfaced with the help of a mixture comprised of cellulose nitrate. Other major components are pigment, camphor oil and alcohol. This is also used as a material for the purpose of bookbinding as well as upholstery covering. Rexine is also used widely used for the purpose of upholstering and trimming all the interiors of motor vehicles that have continuously been produced by the British car manufacturers. Apart from motor vehicles, they are also used for railway carriages.

Artificial leather

Rexine is described as a brand of an artificial leather. It is particularly very durable which means that it is also a high- end product. This durability has ended up satisfying millions of users around the globe. You can also be one of these customers. There is a need of materials made with Rexine because of the high level of sophistication and comfort that they offer. Below are a few tips that you can follow while cleaning Rexine.

1. Don’t overdo it

This is the secret to cleaning cloth materials. You never have to overdo the cleaning because it can seriously damage the product. A minimum amount of cleaning can also go a long way.

2. Use appropriate agents and tools

Not every tool or agent will be good enough to clean the material appropriately. You need to make sure that the tools you use are appropriate enough. There should be no room for error as far as these tools are concerned.

3. Don’t clean often

Yes, Rexine materials do not require cleaning regularly. If you do it seldom, it is more than enough. This is the best thing that Rexine products and materials possess. They are easy to manage and use which means that are low- maintenance.

4. Don’t damage the leather

As you know that the leather is artificial. This means that you must take adequate care of this leather. Even a slight damage can cause problems in the long run.

If the above tips are followed without fail, you will be able to safeguard Rexine for a long period of time. This is exactly we require as users or customers and this is exactly what you will be able to get in the long run. It is one of the important things to remember.

Can The Wrong Car Cleaning Products Damage Your Car?

If you pay a visit to your local auto parts store you will discover a wall full of car care and detailing products. It's no different on the web. Most retailers of car detailing supplies have so many cleaners, polishes and waxes that it's nearly impossible to tell the difference between even the most basic items. So how do you know what works and what doesn't? More importantly, can the wrong products damage your car?

Practically speaking, there are only a few categories of detailing products. For ease of discussion you can break it down into cleaners, polishes and protectants. A few products have more than one purpose. Chemicals that clean and protect in a single step are a good example.

Car Wash

A car wash is a gentle soap that's designed to clean the exterior of your car without removing wax protection. A soap is not the same as a detergent. A detergent will remove wax protection with a single use. That's why you should not use a household cleaner like Dawn dish washing liquid, unless you're planning to wax your car.

I recommend selecting a car wash soap based on what works best for you. You may need to try a few because they all react a bit differently to water quality conditions. That said, all of the major brand names are pretty close in quality. I like Meguiar's Gold Class. Mothers California Gold is another popular brand.

Tire and Wheel Cleaners

A tire cleaner is a detergent that has enough cleaning power to cut through old tire dressing and the road grunge film that builds up on tires and turns them brown. Be careful. If you find a product that contains petrochemicals or bleach, stay clear. These chemicals will really do a number on fine alloy wheels and they cause tires to age prematurely.

To properly clean your wheels, look for an all-purpose cleaner or an all-purpose wheel cleaner. Don't use an acid based cleaner unless you have chrome wheels. If you don't use a cleaner containing acid correctly it will permanently damage your wheels.

Engine and Undercarriage Cleaners

Most people don't clean their engines, but it's a great habit to get into because it helps reduce corrosion. Once a year of so is perfect. It takes strong chemicals to remove dirt, grease, oils and grime. The best cleaner for this job was d-limonene, but it is an environmental hazard, so it's banned in many areas. I suggest a detergent cleaner, not petroleum, such as Meguiar's new engine cleaner. They really did a good job formulating it for new engines with plastic covers and other composite components.

Leather and Vinyl Cleaner

Leather and vinyl are common throughout car interiors. Both materials are very durable, but the sun, dirt and oils from our bodies can cause rapid deterioration. Skin oils cause vinyl and leather to age and discolor, so frequent light cleaning is necessary to avoid issues. It's difficult to tell where real leather ends and plastic or vinyl begins theses days, so I recommend using a product designed for both. Lexol is the recognized leader.

Upholstery and Carpet Cleaners

For your carpet and fabric finishes, including carpeted floor mats, you can choose sprays or foams. There's no easy answer here because there are advantages and disadvantages to each. Foams have the ability to push dirt to the surface where it can be vacuumed away. They also put less liquid into the fibers so the carpet or fabric dries faster. Conversely, liquid cleaners thoroughly wetting the fabric and carpet fibers for deep cleaning. I prefer liquid cleaners.

Glass and Plastic Cleaners

Ammonia-based glass cleaners should not be used on your vehicle. It's harsh on interior car surfaces and it's a health risk when used in confined spaces. A better solution is a damp microfiber towel. They clean glass without using chemical cleaners. You can clean clear plastic surfaces, including window tint film, with a glass cleaner as long as it does not contain ammonia or alcohol. These chemicals will ruin clear plastic. A better solution is to use a plastic cleaner, such as Plexus.

Paint Polish

Paint polish, not car wax, is what gives paint its high gloss shine. Choose a car polish that matches the needs of your car's paint finish. New cars need a fine polish that cleans more than polishes. This type of polish is typically called a pre-wax cleaner. If you have swirl marks, fine scratches or water spots, choose a polish that specifically addresses these problems, but don't use heavy rubbing compounds.

Clay Bar

About ten years ago a new product came onto the market for general use that cleans better than car polish. It's called detailing clay, and it works like an erasure. Using a spray lubricant to prevent sticking, you simply rub the clay bar over the paint finish to make it clean and slick again. All of the bonded contamination transfers directly to the clay.

Car Wax

The final step is waxing. These days, "car wax" refers to any coating you apply to protect the paint. Synthetic waxes are also called paint sealants. Be leery of false claims on paint sealants. Too many products claim to last a year or more, and it's simply not true. Regardless of any claim, your vehicle needs regular cleaning and waxing to prevent surface oxidation. Waxing three to four times a year is optimal.

The Science of Car Cleaning Products

In most cases you can clean and protect your vehicle with just a few basic car cleaning products. In this article you will learn some of the science behind auto detailing supplies so you can clean your car the right way.

Soil can be organic, non-organic or petroleum. That's important to know. If you can identify the soil you're dealing with you can use the right cleaner. When you use the correct cleaner most stains come out with ease.

Take organic soil as an example. Organic basically means that it contains carbon. Stains in this group include proteins, animal fat, body oil, mold, yeast, insects, bacteria and excrement. The classic example is the batch of hot French fries your three year old spilled on the back seat. That's an organic soil stain.

Non-organic soil does not have carbon molecules. Most often we find these stains on the exterior the vehicle. A good example that frustrates most of us from time-to-time are water spots from minerals. Acid rain spots fall into this category, as well.

Finally we get to petroleum. These soils come from substances that do not contain or cannot be mixed with water. Motor oil, grease and road tar are the most common petroleum soils. Note that chewing gum is also a petroleum soil.

Now that you are aware of the three types of stains we can begin to discuss cleaners. Let me tell you, there are a lot of them. Unfortunately, no one has invented a true all-purpose automotive cleaner. Due to the many different surfaces and soils, automotive cleaners are complex mixtures of chemicals blended for a particular type of surface or soil. The most common chemicals used include surfactants, solvents, wetting agents, saponifiers and chelators.

Soaps and detergents are made using a surfactant. It's an agent that has two compounds. One molecule is attracted to the soil itself, while the other loves water. The compound that's attracted to water is a hydrophile. Its job is to surround the soil. The soil attracting agent is a hydrophobe. Its purpose is to break up the soil so the hydrophile can get to it and make it float away.

All cleaners needs a solvent of one sort or another to dissolve dirt and carry it away. Some solvents, including mineral spirits, work on petroleum soils and may be necessary on surfaces damaged by water. Did you know that the most common solvent used in cleaners is water?

Speaking of water, any solution that has a water base or mixes with water has a pH level. The term pH is merely a measurement of the relationship between hydrogen ions and hydroxyl ions. When you have more hydrogen ions than hydroxyl ions, that's an acid. Likewise, if you have more hydroxyl ions than hydrogen ions it's an alkali. Knowing this is important because any cleaner that falls at either end of the pH scale can cause serious damage.

The pH scale runs from 0 to 14. The lower half of the scale represents acids and the upper half represents alkalis. As you might have guessed, water is neutral and has a pH of 7.0.

If you know the pH of a cleaner you will know where you can use it. A carpet shampoo should have a pH around 8 or 9, whereas an all-purpose wheel cleaner should be between 12 and 14. Try using a cleaner made for wheels on your car's fabric and carpet will make a pretty big mess.

Now that you know the basics you can better understand why there are so many car cleaning products and auto detailing supplies. Your vehicle has many different surfaces and they have different cleaning requirements. You can avoid using harsh cleaners by using basic protection. Wax the exterior several times each year and protect the interior with appropriate products. For the ultimate in protection, use an outdoor car cover or a waterproof car cover when you park outside.